My CPA: A Love Story

October 6th 2015

People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care became a cliche because it’s true.

\r\n\r\n

A case in point is Robert Wharff, CPA. Robert’s an old friend who's been doing my taxes for years. He is saintly in his patience with my lack of bookkeeping skills and general disinterest in all things tax related. 

\r\n\r\n

To make me an even more challenging client, I have been audited by the State Tax and Revenue Department three or four times over a dozen years due to my unclear reporting processes of out of state income. The wailing that occurs when I get yet another audit notice is matched only by the swearing. 

\r\n\r\n

Poor Robert. I felt guilty asking his help again for the same problem, so I decided to handle it myself. When I told him my plan, he rejected it, assuring me that this issue would be more effectively handled by a CPA. Of course, he was right. A few documents, a phone call, and one letter later, my problem was resolved.

\r\n\r\n

Throughout this process, Robert  helped me remain calm by communicating optimism:

\r\n\r\n

“Come on, Melinda, we can do this.”

\r\n\r\n

“Quit worrying, you know I have your back.”

\r\n\r\n

“There’s no need to be afraid.” (Or cry. Or swear.)

\r\n\r\n

It's behavior like this that makes me adore him as a person and as a professional. I have always known that Robert is smart. CPAs usually are. But it is his communication skill and emotional intelligence that make him shine and compel me to recommend him to others.

\r\n\r\n

It’s not just what Robert knows; it’s what he says and how he behaves toward me. You could say that working with Robert is like being wrapped in a warm, fuzzy CPA blanket. That might be exactly the feeling your clients are looking for.

\r\n

communication, professional development, leadership, management

Comments



Leave empty